SRUC

SRUC Ayr Campus

Semester 1:

Action for Biodiversity (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM
This module will look at the mechanisms for delivering biodiversity conservation, the successes and conflicts that they have caused and their impact on wider land use and planning issues. The wide-ranging involvement of groups and the large number of initiatives involved in the delivery of biodiversity conservation mean that case studies will be a valuable method of approaching the topic and will give you the scope to critically assess the success of these initiatives in a seminar format.
Advanced Agronomy (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM
The aim of the module is to provide an understanding of the physiological basis of biomass and yield production by crop canopies. This framework can be applied to a wide range of agricultural and horticultural crops, to explain how variation in environmental and management factors affects growth and yield and to discuss practical approaches to maximising yield. Requires some knowledge of Agriculture.
 
Ecology: Management and Impacts (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday AM
This module reinforces and develops an understanding of ecological principles and how they inform good management practice. The wider countryside and anthropogenic habitats are emphasised. An understanding of the use of the ecological literature is developed and students gain practice in presenting complex scientific material to an audience.
Experimental and Analytical Techniques (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday AM
The aim of this module is to strengthen the practical skills of the students and to introduce them to advanced techniques and instrumentation used in laboratory and field scientific research by providing practical experience under supervision. The focus will be primarily directed towards specialist techniques and instrumentation not covered in the earlier years of study.
Historical Geography (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday PM
This module is for students who have an interest in landscape history and want to find out more on how to research it. It also covers aspects of establishment of an archive and issues with preservation and presentation of material – this is of relevance to countryside managers and land managers who may have such site information and need to use it for their own site’s management planning/development, as well as feeding into visitor interpretation. The module is taught using a mix of lectures and two case studies looking at a particular area of Scotland.
Livestock Production Technology (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Monday PM
The efficient production of high quality animal products is based on a sound understanding of animal science and a range of established and novel technologies. This module explores the current and future application of animal science, technology and biotechnology in improving the efficiency of livestock production systems in terms of the health and welfare of the animals and the suitability of their products for modern market requirements.
Management Skills and Entrepreneurship (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday PM
This module is designed to further advance the student’s understanding of business management techniques. Students will then apply these in order to develop their knowledge and understanding of the entrepreneurial skills required by managers in the small business and corporate sectors.
Managing Environmental Community Projects (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday AM
Involving local communities is a key part of work in a wide range of contexts today. Indeed, in practical terms, key sources of funding can only be accessed via engagement with community groups. Policies and initiatives are continually being developed that give this approach impetus. The approach requires a different style of working – as facilitator rather than leader. There is a wide range of agencies, approaches and people involved in this work. It is therefore vital that students have a clear understanding of the principles that underlie this type of working, good practice in implementation and the different roles played by different agencies/workers. The complexity of funding environmental projects and the potential sources and difficulties of managing multiple funders need to be considered for successful projects.
New Perspectives in Plant Protection (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday PM
The objectives of this module are to provide you with knowledge of pest/weed population dynamics, disease epidemiology and pesticides. As crop protection is still dominated by the use of pesticides in the majority of crop systems, the aim is to introduce the discovery and mode of action of pesticides, and to make you aware of the effects of such agents on the environment as well as the strategies to avoid resistance. The forecasting of pest, disease and weed outbreaks, and the use of the appropriate pesticide dose will also be introduced within the context of rationalising pesticide use.
Research Skills and Data Analysis (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday AM
Research investigation generally involves a process of generating and testing hypotheses, which are basically statements relating to our expectations about the relationships between different variables. Statistical analysis of data allows us to prove or disprove such hypotheses so that conclusions relating to those relationships can be made. It provides weight to arguments where logical reasoning is not possible or sufficient. The module will introduce basic qualitative and quantitative data analysis methods, in particular focusing on how to develop hypotheses and make inferences from the particular (experiments and surveys) to the general (the whole population). The aim of the module is to provide the student with a basic knowledge of quantitative statistics and qualitative analytical methods such that the most appropriate method is chosen for a given situation. (Note: this module has all its teaching and examinations in Semester 1, but a later project is submitted in March. This can be done from your home institution if you are only studying for the first semester.)
The UK Agri-Food Industries (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday AM
This module is designed to develop an understanding of the structure and operation of the food chain both upstream and downstream of the farm and to explore the outlook for these industries. The module will also provide an overview of the interrelationships that exist between the key operators within the food chain.
Provisional Timetables – Ayr, Semester 1:
Agriculture
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
 
Research Skills and Data Analysis
 
 
The UK Agri-Food Industries
PM
Livestock Production Technology
Action for Biodiversity or Advanced Agronomy
 
Management Skills and Entrepreneurship
New Perspectives in Plant Protection
Animal and Biological Sciences
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
 
Research Skills and Data Analysis
 
Experimental and Analytical Techniques
 
PM
Livestock Production Technology
Advanced Agronomy
 
Management Skills and Entrepreneurship
New Perspectives in Plant Protection
Environment and Countryside
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
 
Research Skills and Data Analysis
 
Ecology: Management and Impacts
Managing Environmental Community Projects
PM
 
Action for Biodiversity
 
Management Skills and Entrepreneurship
Historical Geography

 

Semester 2:

Advanced Case Studies (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM 
This module will develop investigative and problem solving skills through the use of a number of integrative case studies. Each of the case studies will focus on specified aspects of a business and involve the integration of technical knowledge and management skills.
Advanced Financial Management and Taxation (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Monday AM
This module is intended to provide the student with a deeper insight into the role of financial decision-making within an enterprise. It will provide an understanding of the problems of allocation of scarce financial resources within the business, as well as identifying the future effects of present day management planning. Assumes previous study of both Accounting and Economics.
Agriculture, Science and Society (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM
The aim of this module is to enable students to integrate the knowledge they possess and by constructing reasoned arguments, develop a broader understanding of their relevance to related industries and the wider society.  The module will typically involve a series of discussions of topics of contemporary relevance.  Topics will relate to the current and emerging applications of science in the agricultural sector, the impacts these have on the economy, environment and society and the main drivers for advances in the agricultural biosciences. Discussions will include a global perspective as appropriate.  It is designed to develop students’ critical and evaluation skills. Each student will be required to identify and research a current topic of interest and present the issues for open discussion. Students will also be required to participate in discussions following presentations from their peers.li
Animal Welfare and Behaviour (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday PM (by Video Conference)
This module will show how infringement of behavioural expression influences animal welfare and will give an understanding of the ways in which animals experience suffering and the physiological basis of these events. Current animal welfare legislation and common welfare problems will also be addressed.
Bioenergy Production Technology (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Monday AM
Energy derived from biological sources makes an important contribution at a global scale, in reducing the effects of climate change and at the national scale in maintaining energy security.  This module develops an understanding of the biochemical engineering and technological issues involved in the harnessing of biomass sources for energy production. As the imperative for a change to a low carbon economy becomes more evident, it is essential to have a clear understanding of the technology and economics involved in the production and conversion of biomass to bioenergy in order to inform sound development and investment decisions. As well as considering the production and conversion of biomass the study includes the adaptations of fossil fuel fired equipment to accommodate biomass derived energy.
Bioproducts: Technologies and Supply Chains (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday AM
This module develops knowledge and understanding of the current and emerging technologies and supply chains for the production of renewable materials and specialist chemicals from crops, biomass and plant cell cultures. Students also investigate how a variety of factors before and after plant harvest, as well as processing and culture conditions, influence qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the phytochemicals and materials produced.
Crop Growth and Metabolism (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday PM
This module provides an understanding of the physiological and biochemical basis of crop growth and yield production. It considers the factors determining the efficiency with which crops convert light energy into the energy of biomass and then examines how the products of photosynthesis are used to synthesise a wealth of organic compounds, including primary and secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolites have a diverse range of roles in plants and their current uses include pharmaceuticals, insecticides, herbicides, specialist oils and ingredients for the food industry. The chemical composition of harvested crop material is important in determining its possible end use and quality.
Conservation Management Planning  (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday PM
All sites which are managed for nature conservation require management plans outlining the objectives of management and the works/tasks needed to allow them to be fulfilled. There is a generally accepted format which is used by virtually all conservation organisations and this will be examined in detail. Too many plans are written but never put into practice or adequately monitored and an important feature of the module will be the emphasis placed on the implementation of plans as well as their writing.
Countryside Visitor Management (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday AM
This module further develops a range of issues of visitor management in rural visitor attractions in both a theoretical and practical manner and provides students with a full understanding of the increasing importance of visitor management processes in rural areas. Running parallel to an understanding of managing the impacts of visitors in the countryside is an appreciation of service management from a staff perspective. This enables students to develop an appreciation of the importance of front of house management in meeting visitor expectations and influencing behaviour.
Ecology: Issues and Investigation (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday AM
This module allows students with an interest in Ecology to investigate selected topics in greater depth. Students receive guidance on selecting an ecological community or habitat and a topical issue to investigate but are expected to develop the ability to work independently using their own initiative.
Economic Policy and Analysis (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Wednesday AM
This module introduces you to industrial structures and the policy environment within which your industry operates. You will review the scope and potential of economics, and how it can help us understand the issues affecting society today, including inflation, growth, unemployment, the environment, government policy and the international scene. You will gain an understanding of the behaviour of consumers, how policy makers may influence economic decisions and analyse market structures.
Interpretive Planning and Evaluation(Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM
For interpretation to be effective, it needs to be planned and evaluated. This module will examine how evaluation methods and the planning of the evaluation needs are integrated into the planning process.
(Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday AM
This module will examine the nature of land degradation and dereliction, the problems faced in plant establishment and the methods and techniques which have been developed to overcome them. The course will emphasise the importance of following ecological principles in the practice of land and habitat restoration. The module will also provide an understanding of the statutory and political framework relating to the management and restoration of derelict land in the UK. Although emphasis will be on the situation in the UK, world-wide examples will be chosen to illustrate principles and practice.
Land-based Environmental Issues(Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Monday AM
This module will provide an understanding of the main environmental issues associated with land-based industries. It reinforces and builds on material covered in previous course years and broadens the scope to provide a global perspective. UK environmental issues will be reviewed and explored with reference to current practices and solutions. Alternative means of dealing with environmental problems will be examined.
Livestock Enterprise Management (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Wednesday AM
This module aims to develop students’ understanding of how animal production techniques should be managed in order to optimise the efficiency and financial viability of a livestock production enterprise. It includes consideration of the impact of health, welfare, market and environmental issues on production management.
Managing Community Projects (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday AM
Involving local communities is a key part of work in a wide range of contexts today. Indeed, in practical terms, key sources of funding can only be accessed via engagement with community groups. Policies and initiatives are continually being developed that give this approach impetus. The approach requires a different style of working – as facilitator rather than leader. There are a wide range of agencies, approaches and people involved in this work. It is therefore vital that students have a clear understanding of the principles that underlie this type of working, good practice in implementation and the different roles played by different agencies/workers. The complexity of funding environmental projects and the potential sources and difficulties of managing multiple funders need to be considered for successful projects.
Marine Ecology and Conservation (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday AM
This module allows students to develop an interest in the marine environment and encourages them to examine some of the issues affecting the oceans and coasts today. It looks at the relationship between physical and chemical factors and the ecology of marine communities, the impacts of human activities on them and the current conservation issues and initiatives which affect them. An issues-based approach will be adopted with an emphasis on site visits and case studies.

NB: There is a 5 day field trip included as part of the Marine Ecology and Conservation module.  We will be in contact during semester one 2017 for details as booking for accommodation. 
Multi-purpose Woodland Management (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Wednesday AM
This module investigates how to design and manage woodlands to meet modern multi-purpose objectives, such as recreation, landscape, nature conservation and environmental improvement – as well as timber/wood production. It includes arboricultural aspects – tree health assessment and public liability – as well as the environmental psychology, public preference and public perception of trees and woods and of their benefits and disadvantages.
Parasitology (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday AM
This module is designed to develop knowledge and understanding of animal parasites, their relationships with animal hosts and their interactions with the environment and other management factors. It focuses particularly on parasites of farm livestock and companion animals and builds on the principles introduced in the level 8 module, Livestock Health: Approaches to Disease Control. Knowledge of the morphology, life cycles and epidemiology of parasites in relation to the environment and the animal host helps to determine methods for the diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention of parasitic infection. The major goal of studying animal parasitology is to protect animals and improve their health and welfare status. Moreover, a number of animal parasites are zoonotic; veterinary parasitology, therefore, also is important for public health.
Poultry Meat Production Systems (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Wednesday AM 
This module is a web-based course supported by one or more tutorials that provides an overview of how meat chickens and other poultry are reared. Globally, poultry are kept under a wide variety of production systems that range from those with very rudimentary night shelters to those with fully automated, environmentally controlled systems. Commercial production systems with highly selected meat or egg types of poultry require a suitable physical environment, optimal nutrition and efficient protection from the effects of disease.
Project Management (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Tuesday PM
Project management is the application of management principles in order to plan, organise, staff, control and direct resources in pursuit of a specific or one-time goal such as in a landscape management, land engineering or building contract. An important procedure in project resource management is critical path analysis and the students will investigate this and other techniques such as Gantt charts and histograms. The student will learn about the many interdependencies in project planning and that good communication and monitoring is essential. Site visits will play an important part in the module.
Renewable Case Study (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday PM
The ability to investigate a particular site with a view to evaluating the opportunities for the application of renewable energy scheme(s) is a vital skill for those engaged in the renewables sector. The success or otherwise of a scheme depends on the skill of the proposer to make valid assumptions and take appropriate measures to control risk in full knowledge of the technological, environmental, managerial, and financial opportunities and constraints. This module will develop investigative and problem solving skills and enhance decision making processes through the use of a case study designed to integrate technological and business management issues.
Resource Management (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday AM
A farm business is a complex system. To be successful it has to be managed efficiently to achieve goals. This means taking difficult decisions on how best to allocate the physical, financial and people resources, given that the quality and availability of these resources is both variable and limited. This module will help you develop a logical approach to solving farm management problems involving the effective integration of the principal resources of land, labour and capital. In particular, you will learn how to solve problems involving the efficient use of energy, labour, machinery, equipment and buildings on farms.
Rural Development (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Friday AM
This module will explore rural development issues in Western Europe and specifically the United Kingdom from a social sciences perspective. The module examines the shortcomings of historical policies aimed at rural areas and the transition to the modern rural development ethos. Recent rural socio-economic trends are examined to highlight the need for and effects of rural development initiatives.
Rural Sociology, Psychology and the Countryside (Year 3)
Provisional timetable slot: Thursday PM
This module examines the background to attitudes to rural areas through rural sociology and environmental psychology. The perceived rural urban divide and apparent conflicts need to be understood and assessed in the light of changing attitudes and changing rural societies. The use of countryside and green space by individuals is influenced by many factors which may constrain that use or inhibit it altogether.
Topical Issues (Year 4)
Provisional timetable slot: Wednesday AM
This module is designed to develop the critical and evaluation skills of students. The module will consist of a series of structured debates on selected topics of contemporary relevance. Students will be encouraged to research the topics and present the issues for open discussion. The purpose of the module is to allow students to integrate the knowledge they possess and, by constructing a reasoned argument, develop broader understanding of their vocational area and its relevance to related industries and the wider society.

Provisional Timetables – Ayr, Semester 2:

Agriculture Timetable
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
Advanced Financial Management and Taxation or Land-based Environmental Issues
Plant Protection Technology
Economic Policy and Analysis or Topical Issues
Resource Management
 
PM
Crop Products and Potential
Advanced Case Studies
 
 
Animal Welfare and Behaviour
Applied Biological Sciences Timetable:
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
Land-based Environmental Issues
 
Parasitology
Livestock Enterprise Management or Poultry Meat Production Systems
Bioproducts: Technology and Supply Chains
 
PM
 
Agriculture, Science & Society
 
Crop Growth and Metabolism
Animal Welfare and Behaviour
Renewables and Environmental Technology Timetable:
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
Bioenergy Production Technology
Land and Habitat Restoration
Economic Policy and Analysis or
Multi-purpose Woodland Management
Bioproducts: Technology and Supply Chains
 
PM
 
 
 
Renewable Case Study
 
Environment and Countryside Timetable:
 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
AM
Land-based Environmental Issues
Land and Habitat Restoration or Managing Community Projects or Marine Ecology and Conservation
Economic Policy and Analysis or Multi-purpose Woodland Management or Topical Issues
Ecology: Issues and Investigation
Countryside Visitor Management  or Rural Development
PM
 
Interpretive Planning and Evaluation
 
Rural Sociology, Psychology and the Countryside
Conservation Management Planning